A MAN’S GUIDE

Contraception - A Guy's Guide

Puberty, contraception and growing up, you’d be forgiven for thinking that these things only affected women with the amount of resources out there aimed at them. But here is the man’s guide to all of these things. Take a look and find out all you need to know on all the subjects you need to know about as a man.

    INTRODUCTION

    Firstly congratulations are in order because you are turning into a man. Your shoulders are filling out, your voice is getting deeper and soon you will have transformed from the boy you once were into a real man. But with great change comes great responsibility, and this is where a lot of guys in your situation are mistaken, going through puberty does not make you a man. It’s part of it, but it’s definitely not the whole process, being a real man means taking responsibility for yourself, your actions and how they affect others around you, and, especially at your age, a large part of this relates to sex so read on and find out what you can do to truly call yourself a man.

    Guys Guide on Contraception Introduction
    Guys Guide on Contraceptive Options

    YOUR OPTIONS

    One of the first stages of being a responsible man is making the right choices. A simple way of avoiding having to make difficult decisions further down the line is to make smart choices before they happen and as you become sexually active contraception is a big part of this. A big mistake is to think that because you can’t get pregnant yourself that means it’s not your responsibility, but that definitely is not the case. Actually be aware that you may cause pregnancy at any time you have unprotected sex.

    CONTRACEPTION,
    IT’S NOT JUST FOR GIRLS

    An unplanned pregnancy would definitely affect your life just as much as the girl you got pregnant in more other ways than you’ve probably thought about. Having a baby can be one of the most rewarding things you will ever do but it will give you a lot of extra responsibility and affect you emotionally, financially and socially. You may need to start work sooner or have less time to spend with friends and to do the things that you really want to be doing. It's life-changing, that’s for sure.
    You can still also get Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and pass them on if you don’t protect yourself, and these are no laughing matter either. Being open and honest with your partner about contraception is the smart way to prevent a whole lot of difficulties in the future. Sex is meant to be fun, so take the time to make sure you’re doing it safely and responsibly and stop it from turning into a nightmare overnight.

    SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED
    INFECTIONS

    Sexually Transmitted Infections, or STIs, are bad news. Some are curable, some aren’t, but the things they have in common are that you don’t want them and you are putting yourself at risk of getting them if you don’t take proper steps to protect yourself when having sex. Taking the risk isn’t worth it, regardless of what anyone says, a short time of pleasure won’t be worth it if you end up ruining your health or your entire future by infecting yourself. It’s not macho to not use protection, it’s more like Russian roulette and everybody loses at that game sooner or later so protect yourself.

    Guys Guide on Sexually Transmitted Infections - STIs
    Guys Guide on Contraceptive - Protect Yourself

    PROTECT YOURSELF

    You might count yourself lucky to be a guy, no periods, cramps or mood swings to suffer through, and no chance of getting pregnant yourself but there are a few things you might not have thought of. Protecting yourself when having sex, as a man, leaves you two options.
    Firstly, to protect yourself against STIs there is the condom, not wearing one leaves you open to catching anything your partner may have, so you should make sure you’re always wearing on when you do it.
    Secondly, when it comes to getting your partner pregnant, the only thing you can do is either wear a condom, get a vasectomy, or trust them when they say they are using another form of contraception and that they are doing so properly and responsibly. This is the reason that when you have sex you should be prepared, and open.

    TALK ABOUT IT

    Talk openly to your partner, make sure your plans match, make sure you’re both effectively protected and be responsible. Sex is a lot more fun when you can trust, relax and enjoy it.

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    Can a tampon block sperm?

    A tampon is not a means of a contraceptive method and does not protect against pregnancy. Sperm have a goal and they will find a way round.

    If I take care, she won't get pregnant.

    Withdrawal is also called coitus interruptus or the "pull out method" and it requires great self-control, experience, and trust, and as such, it is pretty unreliable. It works, some of the time, by taking the penis out of the vagina before you ejaculate, limiting the chances of any sperm reaching the egg. With each ejaculation you are releasing up to 400 Million sperms. However, not all sperm are released at climax, some are a little more eager than that and can survive inside a woman`s uterus for up to five days, so even though you don’t finish off, you could still finish up making her pregnant.

    Are condoms effective against HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs)?

    Yes. Condoms have been proven to provide protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) as directed. In fact, condoms are the only contraceptive method that also provides STI protection. Condoms provide different levels of risk reduction for different STIs because infections are spread differently—some are spread by contact with bodily fluids while others are spread by skin to skin contact.
    In general, research shows that condoms are most effective in preventing those STIs that are spread by bodily fluids, such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, and HIV. Condoms also can reduce the risk of contracting diseases spread by skin-to-skin contact, such as herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV). However, condoms only can protect against these diseases if the sores are in areas covered by the condom

    How long after having unprotected sex can the emergency pill be taken?

    The emergency pill must be taken within 72 hours (three days) after unprotected sex. The sooner it is taken, the more effective it is. It is most effective if it is taken within the first 12 hours after unprotected sex.

    Is it safe to use the emergency pill more than once a month?

    Repeated administration within a menstrual cycle is not advisable because of the possibility of disturbance of the cycle. The emergency pill should not be relied on as a regular form of contraception, and it is not as effective as other forms of hormonal contraception specifically made for regular use - it is only intended as a back-up.

    Are any sexual positions better than others when using the withdrawal method?

    Withdrawal is also called coitus interruptus or the "pull out method" and it requires great self-control, experience, and trust, and as such, it is pretty unreliable. It works, some of the time, by taking the penis out of the vagina before you ejaculate, limiting the chances of any sperm reaching the egg. With each ejaculation you are releasing up to 400 Million sperms. However, not all sperm are released at climax, some are a little more eager than that and can survive inside a woman`s uterus for up to five days, so even though you don’t finish off, you could still finish up making her pregnant.

    Will douching help to prevent pregnancy after coitus interruptus?

    No not all, however it is far better to bathe and make sure that anything with ejaculate on it does not get near the vagina within one to six hours, their known lifespan outside the body.

    How many days of abstinence or use of another method might be required for each of the fertility awareness methods?

    The number of days varies based on the woman's cycle length. The average number of days a woman would be considered fertile and would need to abstain or use another method varies between 12 to 18 days dependent on the fertility awareness tracking methodology. This adds up to more than half of the total cycle. To avoid an unintended pregnancy you must use another contraceptive method, such as condoms, during your fertile days.

    Can HIV be transmitted through hugging, shaking hands or mosquito bites?

    HIV cannot be transmitted through casual contact. This includes closed mouth kissing, hugging, shaking hands, and sharing food, clothing, or toilet seats. The virus cannot survive long outside of the human body. Mosquitoes cannot transmit HIV, either.

    Will having sex with a virgin cure someone with an STI, including HIV?

    No. Instead, this practice only risks infecting the person who has not yet had sex.

    Will washing the penis or vagina after sex lower the risk of becoming infected with an STI?

    Genital hygiene is important and a good practice. There is no evidence, however, that washing the genitals prevents STI infection. In fact, vaginal douching increases a woman's risk of acquiring STIs, including HIV, and pelvic inflammatory disease.

    LEARN HOW TO TALK ABOUT IT WITH:

    Your HCP

    Your HCP

    Your healthcare provider knows the subject better than anyone; get the right answers for you

    Your Parents

    Your Parents

    They know you better than anyone, and they’ve been through it too

    Your Partner

    Your Partner

    You’re in this together, and not just in the bedroom, be honest